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Sunday, February 22, 2009

Staying Warm


On a cold winter night you just can’t beat the heat from a wood fire. It’s a different kind of warm. It seems like it penetrates clear down to the bone. And then you have that glow of satisfaction because you are not paying some utility company top dollar for that warmth. It gives you a sense of independence. If you do your own cutting you can have a deep down good feeling knowing that you cut and split that fire wood yourself. Having 10 cord or more of wood stacked outside the house gives you that I am prepared for winter weather feeling.

I have heated my home with wood for many years. I will be the first to admit it is hard work, but for me it is worth every bit of it. Our first stove was an old #9 pot bellied antique. It had a small fire door and we had to feed the stove several times per night. That left you pretty tired in the morning. One day I got a 55 gal steel drum and a stove kit and set up a barrel stove in the house. My wife threw a fit and told me to get that ugly thing out of the house. I got her to agree to a 2 week trial period. After two weeks the stove stayed because it performed so well. We could heat the whole house with it and could load it up to last all night long.

It probably depends where you live but out here in rural Nebraska you can get all the wood you want for the asking. I look for wood that is dense and has a high btu value so it will burn a long time in the stove. Around here that would be oak, ash, mulberry, hackberry, locust. Most farmers are receptive to letting you clean up an older shelter belt or tree grove. Logs from green trees need to dry for at least a year. Wood from standing dead trees can be burned as soon as you cut and split it. Even logs laying on the ground are good for immediate burning if they are not punky and rotten.

A pickup, chainsaw, and splitting maul are minimum equipment to getting your own firewood supply. So much the better if you have a log splitter. Some folks for various reasons decide to just buy their firewood from the local firewood business. Being a seller of firewood myself I would advise that barter would work here. You could take your special skills, knowledge and abilities and make a trade for your firewood needs

4 comments:

Marcus Jaurigue said...

There really is something about heating with wood that makes sure you stay warm all the way from the hearth to the heart.

Trick James said...

Marcus, I agree with your comment. Take care of that family of yours. May God bless you and yours.

jambaloney said...

we had a wood stove when i was a kid, i miss the whole experience.... there really is something about it that

we live in the city of ottawa canada, it is bitter cold here in winter ( -30 C isn’t uncommon) . we have an electric furnace, we didn’t get a generator this year and that means we didn’t prep. i feel like an idiot for keeping my fingers crossed.

to fix this situation we have decided to put a wood stove right in the middle of the basement of our little bungalow - i am going to look into your drum kit…great post!!!

Trick James said...

jambaloney

Thanks for the comment

I got the drum door kit from a local farm store here in Nebraska.

The best one I ever had is the 55 gal SOTZ barrel stove kit, they also have a set up for a double barrel kit if you have room to stack one on top of the other where you get exhaust heat before it leave the chimney. Surprisingly my barrel is over 20 years old. The secret is to leave a layer of ash in the bottom whenever you clean the ashes out. This acts like insulation and stops it from burning through the thin metal.

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Nebraska Preppers Network Est. Jan 17, 2009 All contributed articles owned and protected by their respective authors and protected by their copyright. Nebraska Preppers Network is a trademark protected by American Preppers Network Inc. All rights reserved. No content or articles may be reproduced without explicit written permission.